From Congregation Town to Industrial City

by
Format: Hardcover
Pub. Date: 1994-04-01
Publisher(s): New York Univ Pr
  • Free Shipping Icon

    Free Shipping on all Orders Over $35!*

    *excludes Marketplace items.

List Price: $89.00

Buy New

Usually Ships in 2-3 Business Days
$88.56

Rent Textbook

Select for Price
There was a problem. Please try again later.

Rent Digital

Online: 1825 Days access
Downloadable: Lifetime Access
$36.00
$36.00

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

This item is being sold by an Individual Seller and will not ship from the Online Bookstore's warehouse. The Seller must confirm the order within two business days. If the Seller refuses to sell or fails to confirm within this time frame, then the order is cancelled.

Please be sure to read the Description offered by the Seller.

Summary

In 1835, Winston and Salem was a well-ordered, bucolic, and attractive North Carolina town. A visitor could walk up Main Street from the village square and get a sense of the quiet Moravian community that had settled here. Yet, over the next half-century, this idyllic village was to experience dramatic changes.The Industrial Revolution calls forth images of great factories, mills, and machinery; yet, the character of the Industrial Revolution went beyond mere changes in modes of production. It meant the radical transformation of economic, social, and political institutions, and the emergence of a new mindset that brought about new ways of thinking and acting.Here is the illuminating story of Winston-Salem, a community of artisans and small farmers united, as members of a religious congregation, by a single vision of life. Transformed in just a few decades from an agricultural region into the home of the smokestacks and office towers of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company and the Wachovia Bank and Trust Company, the Moravian community at Salem offers an illuminating illustration of the changes that swept Southern society in the nineteenth century and the concomitant development in these communities of a new ethos. Providing a rich wealth of information about the Winston-Salem community specifically, From Congregation Town to Industrial City also significantly broadens our understanding of how wholesale changes in the nineteenth century South redefined the meaning and experience of community. For, by the end of the century, community had gained an entirely new meaning, namely as a forum in which competing individuals pursued private opportunities and interests.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
xi
Maps
xiii
Acknowledgments xv
Introduction 1(4)
The Congregational Community of the Moravians
5(26)
The congregation and a Changing Economy
31(29)
Manufacturing and Community in Salem
60(34)
Community Culture in Antebellum Salem
94(27)
The Community at War
121(23)
Postbellum Winston and Salem: The Emergence of a Business Class
144(28)
Workers in an Industrial Community
172(28)
The Industrial Community: Drawing the Lines of Class and Race
200(39)
Conclusion
234(5)
Appendix A Rules and Regulations 239(3)
Appendix B Occupational Classifications for Population Sample from 1850 Census 242(2)
Appendix C Occupational Classifications for Population Sample from 1880 Census 244(3)
Notes 247(46)
Bibliography 293(16)
Index 309

An electronic version of this book is available through VitalSource.

This book is viewable on PC, Mac, iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, and most smartphones.

By purchasing, you will be able to view this book online, as well as download it, for the chosen number of days.

A downloadable version of this book is available through the eCampus Reader or compatible Adobe readers.

Applications are available on iOS, Android, PC, Mac, and Windows Mobile platforms.

Please view the compatibility matrix prior to purchase.