Democracy Betrayed : The Wilmington Race Riot of 1898 and Its Legacy

by Unknown
Format: Hardcover
Pub. Date: 1998-11-01
Publisher(s): Univ of North Carolina Pr
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Summary

At the close of the nineteenth century, the Democratic Party in North Carolina engineered a white supremacy revolution. Frustrated by decades of African American self-assertion and threatened by an interracial coalition advocating democratic reforms, white conservatives used violence, demagoguery, and fraud to seize political power and disenfranchise black citizens. The most notorious episode of the campaign was the Wilmington "race riot" of 1898, which claimed the lives of many black residents and rolled back decades of progress for African Americans in the state.Published on the centennial of the Wilmington race riot,Democracy Betrayeddraws together the best new scholarship on the events of 1898 and their aftermath. Contributors to this important book hope to draw public attention to the tragedy, to honor its victims, and to bring a clear and timely historical voice to the debate over its legacy.The contributors are David S. Cecelski, William H. Chafe, Laura F. Edwards, Raymond Gavins, Glenda E. Gilmore, John Haley, Michael Honey, Stephen Kantrowitz, H. Leon Prather Sr., Timothy B. Tyson, LeeAnn Whites, and Richard Yarborough.

Table of Contents

Foreword ix(4)
John Hope Franklin
Preface
Timothy B. Tyson
David S. Cecelski
Introduction
3(12)
H. Leon Prather Sr.
We Have Taken a City A Centennial Essay
15(28)
David S. Cecelski
Abraham H. Galloway Wilmington's Lost Prophet and the Rise of Black Radicalism in the American South
Glenda E. Gilmore
Murder, Memory, and the Flight of the Incubus
73(22)
Stephen Kantrowitz
The Two Faces of Domination in North Carolina, 1800-1898
95(18)
Laura F. Edwards
Captives of Wilmington The Riot and Historical Memories of Political Conflict, 1865-1898
113(30)
LeeAnn Whites
Love, Hate, Rape, Lynching Rebecca Latimer Felton and the Gender Politics of Racial Violence
143(20)
Michael Honey
Class, Race, and Power in the New South Racial Violence and the Delusions of White Supremacy
163(22)
Raymond Gavins
Fear, Hope, and Struggle Recasting Black North Carolina in the Age of Jim Crow
185(22)
John Haley
Race, Rhetoric, and Revolution
207(18)
Richard Yarborough
Violence, Manhood, and Black Heroism The Wilmington Riot in Two Turn-of-the-Century African American Novels
225(28)
Timothy B. Tyson
Wars for Democracy African American Militancy and Interracial Violence in North Carolina during World War II
253(24)
William H. Chafe
Epilogue from Greensboro, North Carolina Race and the Possibilities of American Democracy
277(10)
Acknowledgments 287(2)
Contributors 289(2)
Index 291

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